Details

Land Acquisition in Asia


Land Acquisition in Asia

Towards a Sustainable Policy Framework

von: Naoyuki Yoshino, Saumik Paul

109,99 €

Verlag: Palgrave Macmillan
Format: PDF
Veröffentl.: 13.04.2019
ISBN/EAN: 9789811364556
Sprache: englisch

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Beschreibungen

This book explores the existing and diverse institutional bottlenecks of land acquisition, ranging from legal and social to political and even environmental within the Asian context. It identifies the short- and long-term risks associated with land sale through regional case studies and aims to propose a more sustainable policy framework. One such policy framework proposed is that of Land Trust for mitigating some of these risks. For instance, recent studies argue that land trust or land lease is one of the best ways to increase the rate of return to invite private investors into infrastructure investment and industrialization. A rare snapshot of a continent in the process of rapid development, this book offers an invaluable resource for scholars, activists and politicians alike. 
The Long-term Livelihood Effects of Forced Displacement: Lessons from Asia     (Tentative)       Chapter 1: Interdisciplinary approach to long-term welfare effects of displacement Christie Lam (Osaka University) and Saumik Paul (University of Nottingham)     Chapter 2: The short-term versus the long-term effects of forced displacement Nusrate Aziz (University of Nottingham)     Chapter 3: An Overview of the causes of forced displacement: Asian perspective  Anchali Singh (University of Warwick)     Chapter 4: The long-term livelihood effects of the conservation-led displacement in Kanchanpur, Nepal Christie Lam (Osaka University), Basant Pant (International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development, Nepal) and Vengadeshvaran Sarma (University of Nottingham)     Chapter 5: The Political economy of caste, forced displacement and welfare in Nepal Christie Lam (Osaka University), Basant Pant (International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development, Nepal) and Vengadeshvaran Sarma (University of Nottingham)     Chapter 6: The long-term effect of the Sungai Selangor Dam project on indigenous Orang Asli communities in Malaysia Sharina Abdul Halim (LEASTARI, UKM) and Saumik Paul (University of Nottingham)     Chapter 7: Industrialization-led displacement in Malaysia Sharina Abdul Halim (LEASTARI, UKM) and Vengadeshvaran Sarma (University of Nottingham)     Chapter 8: Attitude towards forced-displacement: evidence from West Bengal, India Vengadeshvaran Sarma (University of Nottingham)<    
Naoyuki Yoshino is Dean of the Asian Development Bank Institute (ADBI); Professor Emeritus of Keio University, Tokyo, Japan; and Senior Adviser at the Japan Financial Services Agency’s (FSA) Financial Research Center (FSA Institute).   He obtained his PhD from Johns Hopkins University, where his thesis supervisor was Sir Alan Walters (who was Margaret Thatcher’s Economic Adviser).  He was appointed board of the Financial Planning Standards Board in 2007, and also served as chairperson of the Japanese Ministry of Finance’s council on Foreign Exchange and its Fiscal System Council (Fiscal Investment and Loan Program Section). He was also a board member of the Deposit Insurance Corporation of Japan, chairperson of the Meeting of Japanese Government Bond Investors (Ministry of Finance), and was President of the Financial System Council of the Government of Japan. He is the President of Financial Education Council organized by the Central Bank of Japan, Financial Services Agency (FSA), Ministry of Education, Cabinet Ministry and private financial institutions.Saumik Paul is research economist at the Asian Development Bank Institute (ADBI). Prior to this, he worked at the Hitotsubashi University, University of Nottingham (Malaysia campus), Osaka University and the World Bank. He is interested in policy relevant research on topics related to structural transformation, productivity growth and land reform. His current projects examine land disputes and the process of industrialization in India, Indonesia and Nepal, and also the role of structural transformation in regional growth and convergence in Japan and other Asian countries.
This book explores the existing and diverse institutional bottlenecks of land acquisition, ranging from legal and social to political and even environmental within the Asian context. It identifies the short- and long-term risks associated with land sale through regional case studies and aims to propose a more sustainable policy framework. One such policy framework proposed is that of Land Trust for mitigating some of these risks. For instance, recent studies argue that land trust or land lease is one of the best ways to increase the rate of return to invite private investors into infrastructure investment and industrialization. 

A rare snapshot of a continent in the process of rapid development, this book offers an invaluable resource for scholars, activists and politicians alike. 

Naoyuki Yoshino is Dean of the Asian Development Bank Institute (ADBI); Professor Emeritus of Keio University, Tokyo, Japan; and Senior Adviser at the Japan Financial Services Agency’s (FSA) Financial Research Center (FSA Institute). He obtained his PhD from Johns Hopkins University, where his thesis supervisor was Sir Alan Walters (who was Margaret Thatcher’s Economic Adviser). He was appointed board of the Financial Planning Standards Board in 2007, and also served as chairperson of the Japanese Ministry of Finance’s council on Foreign Exchange and its Fiscal System Council (Fiscal Investment and Loan Program Section). He is the President of Financial Education Council organized by the Central Bank of Japan, Financial Services Agency (FSA), Ministry of Education, Cabinet Ministry and private financial institutions.

Saumik Paul is research economist at the Asian Development Bank Institute (ADBI). Prior to this, he worked at the Hitotsubashi University, University of Nottingham (Malaysia campus), Osaka University and the World Bank. He is interested in policy relevant research on topics related to structural transformation, productivity growth and land reform. His current projects examine land disputes and the process of industrialization in India, Indonesia and Nepal, and also the role of structural transformation in regional growth and convergence in Japan and other Asian countries.
Uses longitudinal data to provide quantifiable statistical evidence for the analysis of forced displacementEngages with both quantitative and qualitative approaches to create a multidisciplinary approachCompiles evidence from across Asia, creating a comprehensive picture of an interlocking set of experiences