Details

Traces of Fukushima


Traces of Fukushima

Global Events, Networked Media and Circulating Emotions

von: Katja Valaskivi, Anna Rantasila, Mikihito Tanaka, Risto Kunelius

51,16 €

Verlag: Palgrave Pivot
Format: PDF
Veröffentl.: 13.04.2019
ISBN/EAN: 9789811368646
Sprache: englisch

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Beschreibungen

This book explores the mediated aftermath and remembrance of the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster through three crucibles: time, space and emotion. Through an ambitious and innovative combination of theoretical and methodological approaches, the book discusses how meanings, emotions and interpretations of disruptive events such as the Fukushima Daiichi disaster circulate and change over time and space in the global, contemporary hybrid media environment. Through its six multi-method empirical case studies from Japanese local newspapers to commemorative Tweets, the volume addresses questions of memory, trauma, expertise and nuclear politics in relation to the three key concepts of the book. The findings of this book provide new insights on research of disruptive media events in the contemporary hybrid media environment.



Introduction: Tracing the Meanings of Fukushima.- Part I - Time.- Dealing with the Disaster – The Live Media Event.- Temporal Affordances in the Networked Remembering of Fukushima.- Part II – Space.- Towards a Geography of Mediated Affect: Discursive Spaces and Emotional Dynamics.- Social Media and Ambient Social Distance.- Part III –Emotion.- The Global Circulation of Affect – The Case of Iodide Tablets.- Affective Entanglements of Expertise – The Finnish Case.- Conclusion: Time, Space and Emotion in Tracing Fukushima.
Katja Valaskivi is Research Director for the Tampere Research Centre for Journalism, Media and Communication (COMET) at Tampere University, Finland.



Anna Rantasila is a doctoral student of media studies at Faculty of Information Technology and Communication Sciences, Tampere University, Finland.



Mikihito Tanaka is Associate Professor for the Journalism School, Graduate School of Political Science at Waseda University, Japan.



Risto Kunelius is Professor of Journalism at Tampere University, Finland.
This book explores the mediated aftermath and remembrance of the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster through three crucibles: time, space and emotion. Through an ambitious and innovative combination of theoretical and methodological approaches, the book discusses how meanings, emotions and interpretations of disruptive events such as the Fukushima Daiichi disaster circulate and change over time and space in the global, contemporary hybrid media environment. Through its six multi-method empirical case studies from Japanese local newspapers to commemorative Tweets, the volume addresses questions of memory, trauma, expertise and nuclear politics in relation to the three key concepts of the book. The findings of this book provide new insights on research of disruptive media events in the contemporary hybrid media environment.



Examines global media events and the increased inter-dependency of nations and political actors. Highlights the complexity and transnational risks from unscheduled disasters to orchestrated summits Considers how global communication infrastructure has been revolutionized by digitalization
“By casting its eye on the Fukushima nuclear disaster this book develops a fresh understanding of global media events in today’s hybrid media environment. Its analyses are a leap forward thanks to a differentiated consideration of the discursive spaces and emotional dynamics that arise when we are confronted with mediatized catastrophes.” (Andreas Hepp, Professor, University of Bremen, ZeMKI, Germany)

“Human beings look for causality everywhere. We understand the word through association, and turn to media to fill in the links between occurrences, events and meaning. The authors offer a convincing explanation for how hybrid media events invite us to link time and space in making affective sense of worlds close and distant. This is an invaluable addition to research on events, media, and cross-cultural meaning making.” (Zizi Pappacharissi, Professor and Head of the Department of Communication, University of Illinois at Chicago, USA)